Canada spying in Mexico: Espionage aimed at friends “never looks good”

News that the U.S. and Canada cooperated to spy on targets in Mexico came out in leaked Snowden documents. (The Associated Press)
News that the U.S. and Canada cooperated to spy on targets in Mexico came out in leaked Snowden documents. (The Associated Press)

By Amber Hildebrandt / CBC News

The CBC News report earlier this week that Canada hacked into Mexican computer networks to gather intelligence is expected to worsen an already tense relationship with a key trading partner.

“This type of cyberwarfare and cyberspying is generally done to countries that are considered your enemy, not your friends, certainly not your partners in a free trade agreement,” said Andres Rozental, a former Mexican deputy foreign minister and career diplomat.

CBC News reported that the U.S. National Security Agency and Canada’s Communications Security Establishment “co-operate closely” on computer network access and exploitation in hotspots like North Africa and the Middle East, but also in friendly nations like Mexico and in Europe.

Those details came out of a 2013 memo, written by the NSA, that was among a cache of documents obtained by U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden, and analyzed jointly by CBC News and the U.S. news site The Intercept.

The memo didn’t name the spy agencies’ specific targets in the countries, nor did it detail the tactics used.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/cse-spying-in-mexico-espionage-aimed-at-friends-never-looks-good-1.3005887

Baja California farm workers strike for higher pay, better conditions

Laborers from the Valle de San Quintin protest on the side of the main highway south of Ensenada. Workers from about 60 farms in the area walked off their jobs on March 16. (Omar Millan/Associated Press)
Laborers from the Valle de San Quintin protest on the side of the main highway south of Ensenada. Workers from about 60 farms in the area walked off their jobs on March 16. (Omar Millan/Associated Press)

By Omar Millan / AP

Workers at large, export-oriented farms in the Mexican border state of Baja California have led a week of violent protests over low pay, abuses and poor conditions, threatening a harvest that supplies millions of dollars worth of tomatoes, strawberries and other crops to the United States.

Burning tires and tossing rocks at vehicles, hundreds of farmworkers have blocked Baja’s main north-south highway on and off, and as many as 50,000 are believed to be on strike statewide as of Tuesday.

Baja California Gov. Francisco Vega said over the weekend that the harvest — and thousands of jobs — were at risk. “If the fields continue without a workforce, the harvests will be lost and that will affect everyone who depends on this part of the economy,” his office said in a press statement.

Many of the workers are migrants from southern Mexican states like Guerrero and Oaxaca who toil at huge hot-house farms just south of Ensenada. Their demands — health care, overtime pay, days off, an end to abuse by field bosses and more pay than the $8 many earn for a full day of stoop-labor — echo those of farmworkers 40 years ago in the United States.

https://www.google.com/search?q=baja+farm+worker+strike+photos&espv=2&biw=1225&bih=633&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=dv8RVfa8B7TIsATH-IGgBg&ved=0CB0QsAQ