First Australian cattle sent to Mexico since 2008

Weekly Times – The first shipment of Australian live cattle in eight years is being sent to Mexico this week. The previous protocol lapsed because there wasn’t commercial interest for the market, however since the Australian dollar has fallen and Mexico has a reduced herd due to drought sell-off, there is now demand.

http://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/agribusiness/cattle/first-live-cattle-shipment-since-2008-sent-to-mexico/news-story/e3798932336982ebc0e7f26f16727f81

Panel insists on need to curb torture in Mexico

Proceso – In presenting its final report to Senate panels, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IMCI) expressed concern about the situation of victims in Mexico, questioned the lack of mechanisms to “restore confidence” and stressed that the most serious problem is the current “uncertainty” surrounding the investigation of the events of Iguala.

http://www.proceso.com.mx/438612/insiste-giei-en-la-necesidad-frenar-la-tortura-en-sistema-justicia-penal-mexicano

Mexico impeded probe into students’ disappearance, investigators say

Relatives of the 43 missing students of the Ayotzinapa teachers college held portraits of the victims in Mexico City on Sunday as a final report by international investigators was released. (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)
Relatives of the 43 missing students of the Ayotzinapa teachers college held portraits of the victims in Mexico City on Sunday as a final report by international investigators was released. (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)

By Jose de Cordoba and Dudley Althaus / Wall Street Journal

International investigators invited by Mexico to help solve the disappearance and probable killing of 43 college students nearly two years ago released a scathing 608-page report detailing how constant obstacles put up by the Mexican government and the widespread use of torture in criminal investigations sabotaged their probe.

The investigators said that evidence showed Mexico’s federal police and the police of Guerrero state had a role in the disappearances of the students that night—an incident that shook the nation. They said the disappearances and presumed killings of the students appeared to be a coordinated effort involving different security forces.

The Mexican government this month declined to extend the contract of the investigative team, which works for the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, or CIDH, the human-rights branch of the Organization of American States. The investigators’ contract ends April 30.

The five experts said they couldn’t ascertain the fate of the 43 missing students. But they said there is no evidence to support the government’s thesis that the students were killed and their bodies burned at a garbage dump. The students were stopped by municipal police in league with a local drug gang in Iguala, a city in the violence-torn southern state of Guerrero, an area known for the cultivation of opium poppy and heroin production.

“We don’t know the final destiny of the students,” said Claudia Paz y Paz, a former Guatemalan attorney general and a member of the independent investigative team.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/mexico-impeded-probe-into-students-disappearance-investigators-say-1461530934