Leaked documents show the Mexican president’s close friend moved $100 million offshore after corruption probe

Mexico's president, Enrique Peña Nieto, at a signing ceremony among the Pacific Alliance at the Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru.
Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, at a signing ceremony among the Pacific Alliance at the Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru.

By Christopher Woody / Business Insider

In 2015, a Mexican contractor — and a close friend of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto — moved roughly $100 million into accounts outside the country amid a corruption probe, according to details posted online by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).

The documents describing the transactions — which Business Insider has not seen — were part of a massive trove of financial documents revealing the offshore holdings of public officials, businesspeople, and other celebrities.

The records leaked by an international group of media outlets come from the Panama-based international law firm Mossack Fonseca, a global firm that also provides trust services and appears to have many high-profile clients.

One of those clients, Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantú, the contractor in question, enlisted Mossack Fonesca to have him create trusts for accounts worth $100 million after he was investigated for allegedly giving special favors to the Mexican president and his wife, according to an analysis of the documents by ICIJ.

That contractor’s companies have won more than 80 government contracts and received at least $2.8 billion in state money, The New York Times reported last year.

http://www.businessinsider.com/panama-papers-juan-hinojosa-enrique-pena-nieto-mexico-2016-4

Hacker says he rigged Mexico’s 2012 election of Enrique Pena Nieto

Peña Nieto's Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI paid him $600,000, the hacker said.
Peña Nieto’s Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI paid him $600,000, the hacker said.

By Oscar Balderas and Nathaniel Janowitz / Vice News

An imprisoned Colombian hacker, Andrés Sepúlveda, claims he fraudulently helped Enrique Peña Nieto win Mexico’s 2012 presidential election, as well as manipulate elections in eight additional countries across Latin America.

Sepúlveda’s interview with Bloomberg Businessweek caused a stir throughout Latin America, as well as the United States, particularly for the alleged involvement of Juan Jose Rendón, a Miami-based political consultant who, Bloomberg wrote, has been called the Karl Rove of Latin America for his dark influence on right-wing politics.

And according to the campaign manager for the candidate whom Peña Nieto beat, cybercrimes of the sort Sepúlveda alleged are still happening in Mexican politics.

https://news.vice.com/article/hacker-mexico-latin-america-rendon-sepulveda-bloomberg-elections

Why the military will never beat Mexico’s cartels

Daily Beast – “Any war that requires the suspension of reason as a necessity for support is a bad war,” wrote Norman Mailer in Armies of the Night. That phrase, applied to Vietnam almost 50 years ago, has come back into my head any number of times during the eight months of the last year I’ve spent covering the Mexican drug war.

For most of that time I’ve been on the front lines of the conflict—often in and around the sun-scorched and cartel-dominated valley called Tierra Caliente—where the daily suspension of one’s reasoning faculties can be a useful coping mechanism.

Even so, at times I’ve found it very hard to support the Mexican government’s increasingly surreal approach to drug war tactics and strategy.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/04/02/will-mexico-s-surreal-drug-war-ever-end.html