How Mexico’s president saw his approval rating plummet to 17%

Marchers in Mexico City express their displeasure with President Enrique Peña Nieto during a February protest, waving flags saying "Peña out." (Jorge Nunez/European Pressphoto Agency)
Marchers in Mexico City express their displeasure with President Enrique Peña Nieto during a February protest, waving flags saying “Peña out.” (Jorge Nunez/European Pressphoto Agency)

By Laura Tillman / Los Angeles Times

In December 2012, when Enrique Peña Nieto took office as Mexico’s president, his approval rating was 54%. It was a modest but respectable showing, considering he’d been elected from a four-candidate field with about 38% of the vote.

The central concerns in the country at that time were violence — measured in homicides, extortions and abductions often linked to drug cartels — and the economy. Peña Nieto, who was the reform candidate of the notoriously corrupt Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, promised to address these concerns and promised that his government would be transparent and accountable to the people.

Now, with Peña Nieto two-thirds of the way into his six-year term, many Mexicans believe he has failed on all fronts and been incapable of meeting the new challenge from President Trump.

His approval ratings in polls have plummeted, even falling below 20%. Though many factors drive polls, here’s a look at some of the significant events that turned public opinion against Peña Nieto:

http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-mexico-president-20170301-story.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *