Diabetes is No. 1 killer in Mexico

NPR – Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to the World Health Organization. The disease claims nearly 80,000 lives each year, and forecasters say the health problem is expected to get worse in the decades to come. The surge in diabetes threatens the very stability of Mexico’s public health care system, according to new reports.

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/04/05/522038318/how-diabetes-got-to-be-the-no-1-killer-in-mexico

Enrique Krause: Will Mexico get territory back?

NYT – To confront Trump’s fake history, some Mexicans are calling for a lawsuit that would aim to nullify the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (signed on Feb. 2, 1848), in which Mexico — invaded by American soldiers, its capital occupied, its ports and customs stations seized — was forced to accept the American annexation of Texas and concede more than half the rest of Mexican territory, now including most of the states of Arizona, New Mexico and California.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/06/opinion/will-mexico-get-half-of-its-territory-back.html

She met Chapo; now TV star can’t return to Mexico

LATimes -The new Netflix series “Ingobernable” — “Ungovernable” — is set in Mexico. But the show’s star had a problem: She couldn’t go there without risking arrest. Kate del Castillo, one of Mexico’s best-known actors, was wanted by authorities for having met with Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Mexico’s best-known drug lord, while he was on the run in 2015.

http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-kate-del-castillo-20170406-story.html

Full border wall not likely, Kelly says

NYT – John F. Kelly, the homeland security secretary, said Wednesday that it was doubtful that a wall along the full border with Mexico would ever be built, despite an oft-repeated campaign promise by President Trump. “It is unlikely that we will build a wall from sea to shining sea,” Kelly told senators on the Homeland Security Committee.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/05/us/politics/john-kelly-homeland-security-border-wall-mexico.html?_r=0

Report says violence cost Mexico 18% of GDP last year

Members of a search group carry the coffin of Pedro Huesca as they walk to a cemetery in Veracruz, Mexico, on March 8. Huesca, a police detective, disappeared in 2013 and was found in a mass grave. His remains were among more than 250 skulls found over the past several months in what appears to be a drug cartel mass burial ground on the outskirts of the city of Veracruz, prosecutors said. (Felix Marquez/AP)
Members of a search group carry the coffin of Pedro Huesca as they walk to a cemetery in Veracruz, Mexico, on March 8. Huesca, a police detective, disappeared in 2013 and was found in a mass grave. His remains were among more than 250 skulls found over the past several months in what appears to be a drug cartel mass burial ground on the outskirts of the city of Veracruz, prosecutors said. (Felix Marquez/AP)

EFE

Violence cost Mexico the equivalent of 18 percent of the gross domestic product in 2016, a year when the homicide rate rose, the 2017 Mexico Peace Index report said Tuesday.

The cost of the violence amounted to 25,000 pesos ($1,335) per person last year, Mexican Institute for the Economy and Peace coordinator Patricia de Obeso told EFE.

The violence is “a tax on the country’s security” that all citizens pay and that comes to more than a month of pay for the average Mexican worker, De Obeso said.

The cost is even higher in states like Colima, where it came to 66,500 pesos ($3,555) and Guerrero, where it totaled 53,600 pesos ($2,865) per capita, the researcher said.

The report’s authors factored direct costs, such as government spending on the armed forces and business spending on security, and indirect costs, including the effect of crime on public perceptions and the loss of a breadwinner for a family.

Society must decide “if the investment we’ve made in the past 10 years in directly fighting drug trafficking … in containing violence, has really had an impact” or whether citizens must ask themselves “what we should be investing in to improve the level of peace,” De Obeso said.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/04/04/violence-cost-mexico-18-its-gdp-last-year-report-says.html

2017 on track to be one of Mexico’s deadliest year

NPR – Murder is on the rise in Mexico. Ten years after the government launched its war on drugs and sent the military to combat cartels, homicides are at levels not seen since the height of that offensive. The violence is widespread, but it remains most prevalent in a few hard-hit towns and cities.

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/04/04/522621303/with-murders-on-the-rise-2017-on-track-to-be-one-of-mexicos-deadliest-years

Chinese automaker eyes plants in 2 Mexican states

Fox News – Chinese automaker Great Wall Motor Co Ltd is considering building an auto plant in two Mexican states hit by U.S. President Donald Trump’s drive to make American companies invest at home. Great Wall Motor, which describes itself as China’s largest SUV and pickup manufacturer, is interested in building a plant in Nuevo Leon in northern Mexico or the central state of San Luis Potosi, three people familiar with the matter said.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/04/05/chinese-automaker-eyes-plants-in-two-mexico-states-hit-by-trump.html

So many journalists killed, newspaper shuts down

Washington Post – The job of a journalist has become so dangerous in the nation that one Mexican newspaper owner has decided he is no longer willing to take on the risk. In a front-page letter published Sunday with the massive headline “Adios!” the owner of Norte, a newspaper in the Mexican border city of Juarez, announced it would be ending its print publication as a result of the ongoing violence against journalists, killings that often go unpunished.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/04/03/so-many-journalists-have-been-killed-in-mexico-this-year-that-a-newspaper-is-shutting-down/?utm_term=.4cd5ee1cfbcc

Mexico to put endangered vaquitas in refuge

Phys Org – In a bid to save the world’s smallest species of porpoise from extinction, the Mexican government announced plans to place some of them in a temporary refuge. The environment ministry said the “ambitious emergency plan” to save the vaquita marina porpoise would be carried out with help from international conservation groups. However, the plan is controversial with conservationists, some of whom say the vaquita is not an animal that can thrive in captivity.

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-mexico-endangered-vaquita-porpoises-refuge.html

Amazon’s “Mexico will pay” costume draws criticism

Mexico will pay costumeFox News – A Halloween costume on Amazon is causing outrage. Costume Agent’s unisex “Mexico Will Pay” jumpsuit isn’t sitting well with some Amazon customers who say the costume is racist. A petition to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos demands the costume based on President Donald Trump’s efforts to build a border wall between the United States and Mexico, be taken down immediately.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2017/04/04/amazons-mexico-will-pay-costume-upsets-activists.html

Activists hope Metro seat will curb bad behavior

NPR – Activists in Mexico are taking aim at male riders of the capital city’s packed public transit system. They are hoping that a new, provocative campaign that includes a good dose of shock and shame will change men’s behavior toward female transit customers. Activists outfitted a subway car with nude male torso on a single seat back and prominent genitalia where riders would sit.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/04/01/521863660/anti-harassment-campaign-startles-mexico-city-subway-riders